Tag Archives: Turkey

ENTERING GREECE FROM TURKEY

It is not necessarily to clear custom at a “Port of Entry” when arriving to Greece, from Turkey or other country outside Schengen.

Greece boarder control

Greece boarder control

All you need is a Greek Entry Form and a Hellenic Coastguard office, Port Authority.  I guess another requirement is a local police office.

You can download  the Greek Entry Form here.

As you can see you are supposed to call up the Hellenic Coastguard and ask for permission to enter the harbor.  This was something we did not do!

At arrival you visit the Port Authority with the form passports and people onboard.  Port Authority will check identity of the people against the passports before they sign and stamp the entry form.  After that it is time to visit the local Police station for a second stamp.

The form should be returned to the authorities when you leave Greece.  We used this form when returning to Lakki, Greece from Turkey.  Instead of clearing in Kos we decided to go directly to Lakki as it would save us one day.   Port Authority and the local Police acted like it was the first time they had seen the Greek Entry Form.  After some telephone calls, they accepted the form and gave us the stamps.

BACK TO GREECE

KNIDOS

This lovely anchorage was right next to a fantastic setting of the well defined ruins of the city: 2 theatres, temples, the agora, city walls and main street steps plus a lot of artifacts dating back to 2nd century AD. Because of the size it was very impressive. Our next and last stop in Turkey will be where we started, D-Marin in Turgutreis where we will officially check out of Turkey.
Turkey was such a special place to visit and a wonderful cruising area. We are leaving with very fond memories of the wonderful people we met, the impressive ruins and the beautiful scenery.

Knidos anchorage

Knidos anchorage

Main street

Main street

Temple

Temple

The store front

The store front

View of Knidos lighthouse

View of Knidos lighthouse

Hellenic symbol

Hellenic symbol

We cleared out of Turkey in Turgotreis. As it is mandatory with an agent we called the same woman who helped us clearing in. Roland thought 70 € for 20 minutes work was a little bit to much. But she showed no mercy, and said all agents charges the same.  After clearing out we got a nice sail to Lakki on Leros.

We arrived to Lakki once again and the first order of business was clearing back into Greece. What should of taken 30 minutes took approximately 2+ hours. First to the Port Authority which went fast but then gave directions to go to the Civil Police department in another village for their stamp.

Roland showed up with a NEW Greek Entry Form he printed from the internet and when he presented it to the Civil Police, there was immediate chaos and phone calling. They had not seen this form. Finally they filled out their part and stamped the paper but then realized they stamped the incorrect date. Roland thought the police officer who did this would cry. As this was a new form, they did not have any. So the police drove Roland back to Bella Luna in the police car so he could print out another form. A young police officer who was the driver had just arrived to the island 3 days prior so Roland had to give him instructions to drive to the village where we were moored. New papers in hand and back to the police station for the right date stamp. The police Captain decided he wanted to ride along on the way back. The whole experience was quite funny and entertaining. We did get a recommendation for good restaurants on the island from the Police Captain as we will be here for several days. The clearing in procedure did not cost anything in Greece as we already had a DEPKA.

The next day while at a gas station buying gearbox oil, a Greek man approaches us and asks if we are from Sweden????? He use to live in Sweden and his late wife was Danish. His name is Alex and he is known on Leros because he holds the record for catching the biggest Tuna, 250kg.

His boat was behind the fuel station where he keeps it for the winter. It is a small motor boat and he has it equipped like a true professional that he is. He use to fish crabs in Alaska and lived in Seattle so we had much to talk about. Alex also lived in Japan for some years. He set us up with some fishing gear that is guaranteed to catch us fish in the MED. We have promised not to spread his secret! He was a very interesting character that you could listen to for hours. At 80 years old he is still going strong and has a great outlook on life. He loves to go out fishing on the days he is inspired and play his classical music on his wonderful stereo system. The Dolphins always come and visit him as they love the music too.

This morning walking to the bakery, I saw a new crowd of refugees sitting on the dock next to the Coast Guard boat. They were attempting to enter Greece via a inflatable boat and when they saw the Coast Guard boat they sliced holes in the boat so they would have to be rescued by the CG. They will be processed and then released to their own accord but will be informed they can only stay within the EU for 6 months.

Further down the street what I thought was students playing as they prepared to start school was actually a protest that I got in the middle of and knew immediately this was something serious. I later learned that they were protesting to have a teacher removed from the school. Seems the teacher loves animals and frequently when she sees a stray dog or cat in the street, she leaves the students and goes out into the street to rescue the animal. The kids were successful in their protest and the teacher will have to leave her position within one week. Unfortunately in the process of the riot the kids did do some damage to the school property.

We have now arrived to the north end of the Leros Island where the Artemis Leros Boat yard  is located and where Bella Luna will spent the winter until we return in April 2015.

DEMRE, LYCIAN TOWN OF MYRA

Many Greeks lived here until the 1920s when they were forced to migrate to Greece after the population exchange between Greece and Turkey. Today the town is very agricultural, surrounded by fields of greenhouses.

Saint Nicholas Church: The earliest church was built in the 6th century. The constructed church of today was mainly constructed from the 8th century onward. This church was dedicated to Saint Nicholas, patron saint of sailors but better known as father Christmas. Many stories are told of the good Bishop of Demre, and perhaps he was indeed a generous man who extended charity to the poor of his town. He died here and his grave became very important and was visited by many. In 1087 his bones were stolen by merchants from Bari, Italy and were taken to a church there, where they now lie.

St. Nicholaus church

St. Nicholas church

Paintings in St. Nicholaus

One of many paintings in St. Nicholas church

There are 2 sets of Lycian rock cut tombs. They were designed to look like wooden houses. Some of them have figures carved above the door which might indicate the type of persons entombed. Perhaps warriors as the photo shows.

Myra

Myra with the Roman theatre and Lycian tombs in background

Tombs in Myra

Tombs in Myra

The Roman Theatre was constructed 200-225 AD and sat 11,000 people.

11000 people could be seated

11000 people could be seated in the theatre

Roland in the VIP seat

Roland in the VIP seat at the Roman theathre

Well preserved

Well preserved

During our 3 day stay in Ucagiz we ate at Hassan’s Restaurant several times and got to know the family. Hassan’s fish was the best we have had in Turkey and their appetiser buffet is very good. They invited us to use their dock anytime for our dingy and assisted us getting a private taxi to Demre. They are very helpful to sailors and oh so friendly.

Hassan Restaurant in Kekova

Hassan Restaurant in Kekova

Hassan with family

Chef Hassan with family